Swimming Safety for Children

It’s that time of year again where families are enjoying the sun, the waves and each other. Summertime activities for families often include spending time at the pool or the beach as a refreshing getaway from the daily grind.

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What can be a wonderful way to spend time with your loved ones can turn into a traumatic event in a flash. Nearly 3,000 children annually are treated for accidents that occur in water related activities. Of those figures nearly 400 result in death and 50% of child survivors of submersion incidents are left with brain damage.

75% of children who are treated for submersion incidents are under the age of 3 years old. Statistics also show that over 60% of the victims were under adult supervision in a familiar area such as their own back yard.

Drowning accidents happen quickly. On average, a child who has drowned was unsupervised for less than 5 minutes. This means, the time it takes to glance at your cell phone or take call is enough time for a child to drown. Every second counts!

Child drowning is a silent death. Small children will not be splashing about or calling out for help. You will not be alerted if a child is in trouble.

If you will be spending time near water, please remember these important safety tips for children:

  • NEVER leave a child unsupervised by a pool or water for even a moment and do not assume flotation accessories, safety devices or life jackets will do the job alone if you step away for a moment.
  • ALWAYS have young children or inexperienced swimmers war a US Coast430d12aceb248f1272a55a9c9db0350b--kids-swimming-swimming-pools.jpg Guard Approved Life Jacket
  • DO NOT allow a child in a pool without an adult also in the pool.
  • Install a fence or other barrier around the pool. If the house is part of the barrier, the doors leading from the house to the pool should be protected with an alarm. The fence or barrier should be at least 4 feet high and have no foot- or handholds that could help a child climb it. Openings in the barrier should be less than 4” in diameter. Also, the gate and barrier should have no opening greater than 1/2 inch within 18 inches of the latch release mechanism. This prevents a young child from reaching through the gate and releasing the latch.
  • Above Ground Pools should have steps or ladders leading to the pool disabled, locked or removed when the pool is not in use.
  • Keep toys away from the pool when not in use and never leave or allow use of items such as tricycles or other riding toys near the pool.
  • Don’t assume if there is a Lifeguard on duty you don’t need to keep a constant eye on your child. Lifeguards are watching everyone and usually very busy. All people in the area are their responsibility so their focus must be constantly shifting and we cannot stress enough that it only takes a few seconds for a child to slip underneath the water and silently suffer.
  • At beaches or lakes where there is a lifeguard present, be sure to check with the guard to find out about the current water conditions. Unlike the calm waters of a swimming pool, the ocean has dangers such as currents, tides, or undertow.
  • Before you go to a water park, make sure there is a qualified lifeguard on duty at all times, be aware of which rides are appropriate for your child based on the age and size of your child, and review the rules of the water park in detail with your child making sure he/she understands.
  • At lakes and ponds remember the surface likely has jagged rocks, broken bottles and hazardous trash as well as vastly changing depths from the shore to just a few feet out.

KidsPlayingInLakeSummer-1464474088-1.jpgWhenever a child is missing, check the pool first. Every second counts! If you find a child in the water, instantly get him/her out and call to others for help. Make sure someone has called 9-1-1 immediately.  Check to make sure the child’s air passages are clear. If the child is not breathing, start CPR if you are trained to do so. When the emergency number is called, follow the instructions the emergency operators provide. If you suspect the child has suffered a neck injury, such as from diving, keep the child on his/her back and brace the neck and shoulders with your hands and forearms to help keep the neck from moving to minimize further injury until emergency help arrives. This type of immobilization is best done by someone who is trained in the technique. Keep the child still and speak in calm tones to keep the child comforted. Continue to watch for adequate breathing.

For more safety tips and advice regarding children’s water safety, visit Kid’s Health for Parents. For tips about sun exposure safety, be sure to check out our previous blog “Keeping Summer Fun and Safe” and be sure to follow the Close Range Safety Tips blog year round for useful information.

Close Range Safety Training Academy recommends that everyone receive First Aid and CPR training for adults, children and infants.  We offer multiple American Red Cross courses that can aid in saving lives and preventing injuries.  To book your training, please visit www.closerangetraining.com.

Safeguarding Your Summer: Backyard Bash Safety 🏡 🎉

With summertime upon us, many are considering yard parties.  Fun in the sun, grilling, outdoor sports, and swimming all sound grand this time of year and that’s because it is grand!

Most outdoor parties come and go without a hitch, but unfortunately accidents do happen.  With that in mind, here are some simple ways to avoid accidents and host a worry free backyard bash:

  • outdoor-entertaining.jpgThoroughly inspect your yard for any things that could be a danger such as wasp nests, standing water (mosquito breeding grounds),anthills, holes, trip hazards, rotting trees or limbs that could fall, rusting equipment, low hanging electrical wires, or anything you can see as a danger – particularly to small children or adults who may be under the influence. (It’s a party, there will be alcohol!) Remove the hazards, cover them or flag them with reflective materials.
  • Be sure moving vehicles are away from your guests.  If possible, have a pedestrian entry to your party distanced from the parking.
  • Be prepared to accommodate children if your party is family friendly.  There’s more to this than just saying it’s ok to bring your children because once they are there if they are not occupied they will be underfoot and more likely to have or cause accidents.  Consider the age ranges and have play areas set up for little ones and some outdoor sports for the teens.  Be sure there are no choking hazards with any of the toys you provide.  Perhaps, ask guests in advance, what they recommend for their children or suggest their children bring their own entertainment to share.
  • Food safety is key to avoiding a party gone wrong! If your outdoor fun includes grilling hamburgers, play it safe by handling raw ground beef carefully. First, be sure you keep the meat cold (40 degrees F or less) until it is cooked. Second, cook ground beef to a safe temperature of 160 degrees F so that bacteria such as E. coli are killed. Poultry products, including ground poultry, should always be cooked to at least 165 °F internal temperature as measured with a food thermometer; leftovers should be refrigerated no more than two hours after cooking. When preparing food, never use the same dish for raw meats and foods that will not be cooked. Don’t let perishable food sit out while swimming or during other activities. If the temperature is above 90 degrees F, food is not safe to sit out longer than one hour! Keep hands and all utensils clean when preparing food.  To learn more about grilling safely, check out our previous blog about Backyard Grilling Tips.
  • Be responsible with alcoholic beverages.  Adult beverages go hand in hand with adults partying and there’s nothing wrong with that, but as a host there are certain precautions you should take to prevent any incidents caused by alcohol.  First and foremost you want to make sure none of your guests get behind the wheel after heavy drinking. Of course, it’s best to prevent heavy drinking if you are able.  Some easy ways to do that are;
    Make food more easily available than alcohol.  When your guests have a full tummy it slows the effects of alcohol and when alcohol isn’t right at the forefront of the party guests will likely drink less.
    Have a bartender or someone in charge of serving the drinks so that guests won’t be able to overpour the alcohol or consume it at a faster rate.
    To learn more about hosting a party with alcohol as well as being a guest who likes to consume alcohol, check out our Holiday Party Safety Blog!
  • If you have a swimming pool on your property, be aware of the dangers and kids-at-swimming-pool.jpghow you can prevent accidents. Prior to your party, make sure you have adequate anti-entrapment drain covers for your pool.  During your party, have a designated adult who knows how to swim watching over swimming pool activity at all times. Do not allow people who have consumed a lot of alcohol in or close to the pool.  If at all possible, have someone at your party who has been CPR/First Aid trained.  Learn more about swimming pool safety not just for your party, but for year round safety on the pool safety website.
  • Is your pet ready to party? Pet safety at parties is easy to overlook. Of course you want to include your pet in the festivities, but it’s important to honestly assess your pet before adding him or her to the guest list. If your pet is aggressive in any way, overly excitable, or very shy, he or she may not be a good guest at the party and may be better off at the sitters for the day.  Also, consider if any of your guests have allergies to pet dander.  And, lastly, consider if your beloved pet can avoid eating the wrong things at a party.  With so many guests and so many plates of food surrounding, your pet may snatch a bite of something you would never give him/her under normal circumstances or your guests may think it’s fun to give him/her some of the food available.  Some food that we humans enjoy is toxic to our furry friends, so be sure that if your pet is wandering around your party someone is 51dhlAusXTL._SL500_.jpgwatching over him/her carefully to be sure no dangerous food is gobbled up.
  • A first aid kit is always important to have on hand in any household, but most especially when the number of people on your property is larger than usual. To learn how to build a first aid kit for you home (as well as your for your vehicle) and for other helpful first aid information visit the Healthy Essentials Website.
  • Earthquakes happen! Obviously your party would be the worst time for one, but it’s always best to be prepared! If you and your quests should be outdoors in the event of an earthquake, remember to Move away from buildings, structures and utility wires. Once in the open, “Drop, Cover, and Hold On.” Stay there until the shaking stops. When the shaking stops, look around. If there is a clear path to safety, leave and go to an open space away from damaged areas. If you are trapped, do not move around just call out for help so others at the party can locate you and assist.  Be prepared to “Drop, Cover, and Hold on” in the likely event of aftershocks.  Once safe, monitor local news reports for emergency information and instructions.  To learn more about earthquake safety and preparedness, please be sure to check out our earthquake safety blog for insightful information about preparedness and safety before, during an after an earthquake.

189f930fba5525b43a8a6d61fe82d65dThe best way to enjoy a party is safely.  Being prepared for emergencies and using preventative tactics is the easiest way to ensure a safe but great time for you and your guests.

Close Range Safety Training Academy shares helpful blogs about your safety and health regularly and we’d love for you to follow our blog! We look forward to you having a safe, healthy and happy celebration and life!