Beat the Heat and avoid the Dangerous Side of Heat Exposure

The population of California grows annually by leaps and bounds.  Many newcomers will tell you the main reason for the move is the moderate weather.  Yes, Californians are blessed with mild winters and low humidity, but that doesn’t mean things don’t get extremely hot in California.

Anywhere you see hot summers you can expect people to suffer from heat related illnesses.  Californians are not exempt from this hazard and we’d like to teach all of our readers how to beat the heat no matter where you are!

Outdoor activities in hot weather and direct sun increase the risk of heat-related illness when overexposure occurs.  When the air temperature is near or warmer than one’s normal body temperature, cooling of the body becomes more difficult. Blood circulated to the skin cannot lose its heat so sweating then becomes the main way the body cools down. But, sweating is only effective when the humidity level is low enough to allow evaporation, and if the fluids and salts that are lost are adequately replaced. If the body cannot get rid of excess heat, it will store it. When this happens, the body’s core temperature rises and the heart rate increases. As the body continues to store heat, the person could suffer from heat related illnesses such as heat rash, heat stroke, exhaustion, or cramps. Usually, when someone is effected by heat illness they begin to have difficulty focusing, may become irritable or sick, and often lose the desire to drink. The next stage is usually fainting and could even result in death without accurate care or if the person is not cooled down properly.

USE THIS CHART TO HELP IDENTIFY SYMPTOMS AND
LEARN WHAT ACTION TO TAKE:

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Outdoor activities are safest when the heat index is <91°F and proper precautions are in place such as plenty of cool fluids available and an ice chest that also has ice packs ready to use. If activities cannot be avoided when the heat index is above 91°F be prepared with adequate amounts of fluids available for everyone who will be in the heat, make sure that everyone is dressed in light, breathable clothing and make sure there is a shaded or air-conditioned area everyone can escape to throughout the day.

Recently, we shared a blog about the importance of sun screen and some valuable tips.  Be sure to read this blog also to be fully safe not only from heat illness but also the dangers of UV rays.

Follow Close Range Safety Tips for blogs about your health and safety monthly and be sure to visit our website closerangetraining.com to see what classes we have to offer!

Keep Summer Sun Fun and Safe!

One of the benefits of the sun’s rays is your skin produces vitamin D naturally when you are in the sun.  If your skin is not prone to sunburn, you can enjoy the health benefits of the sun’s direct rays anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes on your arms, hands, and face two to three times a week to received the vitamin D-boosting benefits of sun. (Note that the sun actually has to penetrate the skin but exposure should be a maximum of 15 minutes before applying sunscreen to prevent damage to your skin.)

While there are lots of great reasons to get out into the sun, remember the ultraviolet rays of sunshine can damage your skin even in cool temperatures.  When summertime arrives we all find ourselves exposed to the sun more frequently.   Summer is a time for outdoor activity with family and friends, swimming, sunbathing and generally enjoying the uplifting weather. But, remember the sun’s ultraviolet rays can damage your skin after 15 minutes of direct exposure.

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Here are 5 key things to remember to protect your skin from the damage of ultraviolet rays:

  1. Seek Shade! Reduce your risk of skin damage and skin cancer by enjoying the outdoors under an umbrella, tree, or other shelter before you need relief from the sun.
  2. Dress Wisely.  In warm weather, we don’t want to be fully clothed because it will look and feel uncomfortable.  But, there are fashions made specifically to have a summertime style while still offering full protection.  For help picking the best UV Protective wear for you and your loved ones, visit this website to learn more.
  3. Wear a large brimmed hat. For the best protection, choose a hat with a brim all the way around that shades your face, ears, and the back of your neck. And, if you wear a baseball cap, you should also protect your ears and the back of your neck by wearing clothing that covers those areas, using a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15.
  4. UV Rays can also harm your eyes – WEAR SUNGLASSES!  Sunglasses protect your eyes from UV rays and reduce the risk of cataracts. Wrap-around sunglasses work best because they block UV rays from sneaking in from the side. When purchasing sunglasses, be sure to read the label to ensure they offer a high level of protection from UV rays.
  5. USE SUNSCREEN! You should use a broad spectrum sunscreen with at least SPF 15. Sunscreen products can only be labeled “broad spectrum” if they have been tested and shown to protect against both UVA and UVB rays. Only broad spectrum sunscreen products with an SPF of 15 or higher can state that they help protect against skin cancer and early skin aging if used as directed with other sun protection measures. Sunscreens labeled with SPFs as high as 100+ are available. Higher numbers do mean more protection, but many people don’t understand the SPF scale. SPF 15 sunscreens filter out about 93% of UVB rays, while SPF 30 sunscreens filter out about 97%, SPF 50 sunscreens about 98%, and SPF 100 about 99%. The higher you go, the smaller the difference becomes. 

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

pink-ribbonAccording to Johns Hopkins Medical Center, 40% of diagnosed breast cancers are detected by women who feel a lump so establishing a self exam on a regular basis is very important. While mammograms can detect cancer before you feel a lump, self exams will familiarize you with your breast so you can better recognize any changes.

You should not rely on self exams alone, however. Doctors recommend women over 40 should also get annual mammograms and clinical breast exams. Mammography can detect tumors before they can be felt. Clinical breast exams are important because they are administered by a professional who can notice abnormalities that you may not recognize.

If your test results are abnormal, note that 8 out of 10 abnormalities are found not to be cancerous. The only way to be certain any discoveries are not cancerous is through further testing such as Ultra Sounds or MRIs. Sometimes your radiologist will require a biopsy as well.

The best way you can fight against breast cancer is to have a plan that helps you with detecting any abnormalities in an early stage. Create your plan by setting reminders to do self exams and also to schedule clinical exams (and mammograms based on your age, health history and history of cancer in your family).

Remember, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths of women in the United States. All women are at risk for breast cancer as well as some men. When breast cancer is caught early and treated, however, survival rates can be near 100%.

Please visit www.cancer.org as a valuable source for more information about cancer prevention, treatment, support and ways you can get involved in supporting the American Cancer Society.

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