Is An A.E.D. Necessary at My Business?

The answer is YES! And here’s why:

An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a lightweight, portable device that delivers an electric shock through the chest to the heart. The shock can stop an irregular heart rhythm and allow a normal rhythm to resume following sudden cardiac arrest (an abrupt loss of heart function). 

The good news is that cardiac arrest is reversible in most victims if it’s treated quickly! The development of the AED, which automatically analyzes a heart rhythm and prompts the user to deliver a shock when necessary, enabled the shocks to be given by rescuers who aren’t medical professionals making  it possible for more people to respond to a medical emergency where defibrillation is required.  

Unfortunately, anyone can experience a heart attack and it can happen anywhere at any time. Often you see headlines where lives were saved at restaurants, sporting events, social galas, churches, gyms, airports and much more by using an AED. Without an AED on site, the only thing bystanders can do is call for help and hope it arrives in time.

OnSite_wAccessories1.jpgHaving an AED on site is the first step toward first response rather than anticipating timely help to save a life. But without proper training, an AED is rendered useless.

Keeping your AED in an easily accessible location is key, but training multiple people on how to use it is critical!

Let’s Review Some Common Questions About AEDs

Are AEDs safe to use? Yes, by anyone who’s been trained to operate them. Studies have shown that 90 percent of the time AEDs are able to detect a rhythm that should be defibrillated. And 95 percent of the time they are able to recommend NOT shocking when the computer shows defibrillation is not indicated.

How does an AED work? There’s a built-in computer that checks a victim’s heart rhythm through adhesive electrodes. The computer calculates whether defibrillation is needed. If it is, a recorded voice tells the rescuer to press the shock button on the AED. This shock momentarily stuns the heart and stops all activity. It gives the heart the chance to resume beating effectively. Instructions guide the trained user through the process.

If an AED instructs you through the process, why is training necessary? People with first aid training are able to recognize wether or not an AED is actually needed.  Users should be trained in CPR and AED use.  Training increases the confidence of responders, eliminating the fear that prevents others to act. Knowledge of how to apply this life-saving equipment to a person is essential.  Though the AED does provide basic instructions and guidance throughout the process, certified training makes a huge difference in the outcome of survival for the victim.

How easy is training and how can I get it? The average AED/CPR and First Aid Training is about 5 hours in length and very simple. There are various training courses available which can range from simply AED & CPR Training to training that includes these as well as pediatric care and first aid. There are several ways to locate training, including visiting the American Red Cross’s website, The American Heart Association’s website, or if you are in the Los Angeles, CA area you can visit our website to request AMRC Certified AED/CPR training here!

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Remember: Cardiac arrest knows no age, sex or weight limits and can occur at any time to anyone. Having an AEDs can greatly increase survival rates and without using an AED the clock is ticking for a person’s survival. AEDs are worth investing in and you never know if one day you may need one to save a life or for someone to possibly save yours.

Stay safe, healthy and in the know by following our blog!

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April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, Please Don’t Look Away!👊🚫

Did you know that April is Child Abuse Prevention month? It’s a topic that many of us do not like to address because it’s very harsh reality to accept. But, unfortunately, it is a reality that affects an average of six million children annually. That’s a staggering number!

The brain develops in response to experiences with caregivers, family and the community quickly during the early developmental stages of infancy and childhood. Development is directly linked to the quality and quantity of those experiences. Repeated exposure to stressful or abusive events as well as neglect can affect the brain’s stress response and over time a child may react as if danger is always present in their environment regardless of actual circumstances.

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Awareness of the signs of child abuse is your first step in saving a child.

Here are some key signs to look for:

BEHAVIORAL SIGNS:

  • Failure to thrive socially or academically
  • Learning and/or Speech disorders
  • Delayed physical, emotional or intellectual development
  • Discomfort with physical contact or difficulty connecting with others
  • Lags in physical, emotional or intellectual development
  • Behavior extremes, such as appearing overly compliant and passive or very demanding and aggressive.
  • Increased fear or avoidance of a specific person and/or situation
  • Difficulty expressing thoughts and feelings
  • Changes in eating and sleeping patterns
  • Bedwetting
  • Anxiety and/or excessive worrying
  • Low self-esteem
  • Uncharacteristic obedience or perfectionism
  • Strong feelings of shame or guilt
  • Programmed statements or behaviors
  • Knowledge of or interest in sexual behaviors that are not age appropriate

PHYSICAL SIGNS:

  • Bruises, welts or swelling
  • Sprains or fractures
  • Burns
  • Lacerations or abrasions
  • Frequent physical complaints, such as stomachaches and headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty in walking or sitting
  • Torn, stained or bloody clothing
  • Pain or itching in the genital area; bruises or bleeding in the external genital area
  • Sexually transmitted infections or diseasesTheir-lifes-stop-child-abuse-28564802-599-775.jpg

Research has found that children exposed to any form of abuse, if left unaddressed or ignored, are at an increased risk for emotional and behavioral problems throughout their life and into adulthood.

Depending on your role in the child’s life, you may or not be privy to prevention but turning a blind eye to the signs of child abuse is never the path to choose. Identifying the signs may be an uncomfortable position to be depending on your relationship with the child, but you can protect your position by being anonymous. There are many sources that can help you help a child, such as Child Help’s national hotline 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453) or you can do an internet search for sources in your area.

We encourage you to visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention to learn more.